How to Get Your Whole Church Plant Engaged in Mission: 3 Vital Questions

For church plants in rapidly changing ministry contexts, questions are far more valuable than more static programs or tools.

How to Get Your Whole Church Plant Engaged in Mission: 3 Vital Questions

My 3-year-old daughter just entered the “Why?” phase of childhood. Everything around us provides endless possibilities for questions. Why is it dark out? Why do I have to go to sleep? Why don’t we eat boogers? As I’ve listened to her unending curiosity, I’ve become convinced that this inquisitiveness is one reason why Jesus called us to become like little children (Mt 18:2-4). Childlike curiosity actually enables us to more faithfully participate in what Jesus is doing around us in the world.

That means that for pastors, ministers and churches in rapidly changing ministry contexts, questions are far more valuable than more static programs or tools. Asking questions puts us in postures of humility and dependence, a posture where we wait upon God and learn to listen to the Holy Spirit. Once we adopt that posture, it’s time to think critically about what kinds of questions we ask. Here are three kinds of questions which can help you engage your whole congregation in more vibrant mission and ministry:

Who is our congregation?

A recent blog post at “Hacking Christianity” tells the story of Brad Laurvick, a Methodist pastor in Denver whose vision for ministry was transformed when another pastor identified himself as pastor to the people of a whole city, not just pastor to a church. That expansive vision of a parish led Laurvick to look for opportunities to serve the community outside the church, including serving ice cream for charity at a local creamery. His thinking demonstrates the ideas of the book The New Parish which encourages churches to recapture their mission to serve and witness to their immediate geographical contexts.

Who is included in your parish? Would the members of your church include their unchurched neighbors in their “congregation”? Do you define yourself as pastor of First Presbyterian Church, or as pastor to the town of Indiana, Pa.? To whom has God sent you?

What is right in our church/neighborhood/town/community context?

It’s too easy to identify and dwell on what is not going well in and around the church. But what if we asked what is right? This practice is called appreciative inquiry. Consider it an application of Philippians 4:8 to your parish or your ministry context: “Whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable—if there is any excellence or anything worthy of praise, think about these things.”

Look at your community: Where do you see truth, justice and beauty happening? How can we lift up the people, events or parts of a neighborhood culture that are commendable? A world that often hears the church pointing out what’s wrong might be pleasantly surprised to encounter Christians with eyes to see how God’s latent goodness within the culture we inhabit.

What actions is God calling us to take?

Scott Belsky, argues in his book Making Ideas Happen that most great ideas never come to fruition because we lack the discipline to translate them into action items. My own denomination—the Presbyterian Church—is often caricatured for forming committees to talk, plan, debate, brainstorm and discuss various ideas, but then failing to translate those ideas into action.

If you lead a church, pay attention and ask these questions in your next meeting: What concrete actions need to be taken in response to our discernment together? Who will take those actions? This doesn’t mean that you need to act on ideas haphazardly. Waiting, praying and learning are all actions that we can take to ensure more well-informed decision-making. But there always comes a time to move from waiting to going, from praying in the church to praying in the street, and from learning with our heads to learning with our hands.

 Lastly, a question for you: What questions have you found to be clarifying or empowering for your ministry?

This article originally appeared here.

Christopher Brown
Christopher is a Colorado native who recently returned home to serve as pastor at the First Presbyterian Church of Berthoud, Colorado. After graduating from CU Boulder in 2004, Christopher and his wife moved to Pittsburgh where he attended Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, co-founded and co-pastored The Upper Room, spent six years in bi-vocational ministry as a barista in a local cafe, and served as the first coordinator of the Church Planting Initiative at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Christopher is a husband, father, runner, writer, musician, and pilgrim seeking deeper life in Christ. Christopher regularly blogs at https://christopherbrown.wordpress.com and tweets at @brwnchrstpher.