10 Things Pastors Are Doing To Raise Large Amounts Of Money

More Money = More Ministry = More People Impacted For Eternity.

Every church whether intuitively or written out has three things: a Ministry Plan, a Facility Plan and a Funding Plan.  

The Ministry Plan is everything God is doing and wants to do at your church.  The Facility Plan is the physical structures which facilitate what God is doing and wants to do at your church.  The Funding Plan provides the fuel.

Generosity is important because it is a measurement of personal discipleship and also helps enable churchwide Ministry Plans to become reality.  In short:

More Money = More Ministry = More People Impacted For Eternity.

Recently, I spoke with Chad Aukland, Senior Consultant for INJOY Stewardship Solutions, and gleaned 10 Things Pastors Are Doing To Raise Large Amounts Of Money.

1. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Have Six Systems In Place To Do So.

A system is anything you do twice at your church.  There are six systems every church must have to raise large amounts of money – worship services (offerings and sermon series), digital giving (online, kiosks, mobile), financial leaders, first time givers, consistent givers, and personal finance classes.

2. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Cast Big Vision.

Money is attracted to vision.  The size of the vision determines the size of the resources needed.  Pastors with small vision receive small amounts of financial resources.

3. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Only Job Is Casting Big Vision.

Pastors should not be turned into fundraisers.  Fully-funded ministries have leverage the senior pastor as a vision caster inviting people into a greater story.

4. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Are Deeply Committed To The Vision.

Often a new building or multi-site project gets delayed.  Successful leaders understand delay does not mean denied.

5. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Have Clear Messaging. 

Howard Hendricks once said, “If it is a mist in the pulpit, it is a fog in the pew.”  A message about the church’s future ministries delivered with clarity increases participation and dollars received.

6. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Develop Relationships With Financial Leaders.

For more on how financial leaders think, read 21 Lessons Pastors Can Learn From LeBron James’ Letter About How Top Leaders Think.

7. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Have A Global Perspective.

Generosity has no borders.  People want to be part of a church who is relieving suffering and serving the poor and under-resourced around the world.

8. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Are Surrounded By The Right Leaders.

The leaders you want to surround yourself with must first love Jesus, love the church and love you.  Not having these qualities disqualifies you from leadership.  But not only do you recruit leaders who want to help you, you must recruit leaders who are able to help you.  Look for competencies, experience, big thinking and the skill needed to address the solutions you face.

9. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money Provide Money Classes For Their People.

People may love you, the church, the vision and its ministries but they can’t help you even if they want to because of debt and financial bondage.  Helping people with their finances is kind, practical and also increases participation.  The best tool I have seen for financial coaching is Joe Sangl’s I Was Broke. Now I’m Not. With onsite coaching, dozens of free online financial tools and six-week studies, this is helping thousands of people across the country.

10. Pastors Who Raise Large Amounts Of Money View First Time And Regular Giving As Important As Sacrificial Giving.

The first time a person gives to your church it is a spiritual decision, not a financial one.  All gifts given out of obedience are celebrated, not just the large ones.

After listening to Chad and his team, let me know your thoughts.

Brian Dodd
Brian Dodd is a church stewardship & leadership consultant. See www.briandoddonleadership.com for additional insights.