Don’t Have Enough? How to Fill the Lack.

You don’t have enough time. You don’t have enough money. Enough energy? Enough resources? Enough team members? Enough new ideas? Enough stamina? You don’t have enough [fill in the blank]. Odds are, one or more of these is immediately true for you right now. In my experience, at least two or more are usually lacking at…

don't have enough

You don’t have enough time.

You don’t have enough money.

Enough energy?

Enough resources?

Enough team members?

Enough new ideas?

Enough stamina?

You don’t have enough [fill in the blank].

Odds are, one or more of these is immediately true for you right now. In my experience, at least two or more are usually lacking at any given time.

But what’s also probably true that in two or more of them you also have a current excess. That is, less than you really honestly need. You’ve got some to spare. Somewhere, most likely, you can afford to scale back.

Can you think of ways to convert excess in one area to help shore up lack in another area? That is the creative task of life. 

As you pray about what you think you lack, consider this:

Bigger is not better, but smaller is not better either.

Bigger is not harder to bear than small. Each requires a different strategy to bear it well.

Bigger can be unsustainable. Smaller can also be unsustainable. Thankfully, both can also be sustainable.

Bigger is not a reward; smaller is not a punishment. 

Healthy things grow. But not every healthy thing grows exactly the same. And some unhealthy things still grow.

Growing for growth’s sake is not good. But staying small for smallness’s sake isn’t either.

Scaling back may be the bet thing for health, which is needed if growth is to last long-term.

Less is more. And sometimes more is less. Other times more really is more and less really is less. 

 

This article originally appeared here, and is used by permission.

Rodger Otero
Along with his his, Angela, Rodger is the co-pastor of the Greenleaf Vineyard Church in Chapel Hill, NC. He is a husband-father-musician-pastor just trying to figure this out as he goes. San Diego is the Motherland, but Chapel Hill is Home. He riffs on formation, leadership, and being fully human.